2017 images of the month

November 2017

Jiaqi Duan - School of Materials Science and Engineering

 

Nickle EBSD

Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) image of a recovered/recrystallized multilayered Ni sample by accumulative roll bonding.

Image by: Jiaqi Duan

Supervisor: Prof. Michael Ferry

Microscope/Technique: JEOL 7001F FE-SEM/Electron Backscatter Diffraction

September 2017

Kumar Sutradhar - Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering

This image shows the cluster of ultra-small cerium oxide nanoparticles functionalized with hyaluronic acid synthesized by a One-pot synthesis method. The most interesting phenomenon is that this particular cluster looks like the map of Australia.

Image by: Kumar Sutradhar

Supervisor: A. Prof. Megan Lord

Microscope/Technique: CM200

 

August 2017

Andrew McGrath, School of Chemistry

The image shows uniform iron nanoparticle clusters (“nanoflowers”), which are made up of multiple individual nanoparticles clustered together. Each individual particle contains a distinct darker-contrast metallic iron core and lighter iron oxide shell.

Image by: Andrew McGrath, School of Chemistry

Supervisor: Prof. Richard Tilley

Instrument/Technique: FEI Tecnai G2 20 TEM

 

July 2017

Chin Ken Wong, School of Chemistry

This cryo-TEM image shows hollow ellipsoidal vesicles that were prepared via the self-assembly of polymer building blocks. The membrane structures of these hollow ellipsoids are made up of strongly electron-absorbing polymer building blocks and therefore appear as dark outlines surrounding individual ellipsoids. The image was taken at a slight defocus value of ~4 µm to improve image contrast and for membrane thickness measurements. Shown inset is a near-focus higher magnification image. These hollow ellipsoids are currently being investigated as drug delivery vehicles.

Image by: Chin Ken Wong, School of Chemistry

Supervisor: Prof. Pall Thordarson and Scientia Prof. Martina Stenzel

Microscope/Technique: FEI Tecnai G2 20 TEM / Cryo-TEM

 

May/June 2017

Yu Chen, Schoool of Materials Science and Engineering

This image shows the microsctructure of a Zr-based metallic glass composite in a wedge shaped sample upon a high cooling rate. The most interesting phenomenom is that the dendrites grow in a curved formation.

Image by: Yu Chen

Supervisor: Dr Michael Ferry

Microscope/Technique: Zeiss Auriga

 

April 2017

Carina Ledermuller, School of Materials Sciences and Engineering

 

This image shows the microstructure of a microalloyed steel within a shearband after advanced thermo-mechanical processing.

With using ECCI (electron channeling contrast imaging) as an imaging technique the subgrain structure could be revealed, showing that ultrafine grain sizes (<1μm) were achieved.

Image by: Carina Ledermueller, School of Materials Science and Engineering

Supervisor: Dr. Sophie Primig

Microscope/Technique: Zeiss Auriga, ECCI

 

March 2017

Angela Lay, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences

 

This image shows an aggregate of framboidal pyrites formed under anoxic environment by biogenic process i.e. pyritic fossilisation of bacterial colonies within dolomitic limestone. Each of the framboid is made up ~1µm size individual euhedral to subhedral pyrite grains and some these individual pyrite is recrystallised to form massive framboid. 

Image by: 

Angela Lay, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences

Microscope/Technique: JEOL JXA-8500F Field Emission SEM/EPMA Hyperprobe

Supervisor: Dr. Ian Graham

 

January/February 2017

Tian Zhang, School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering (SPREE)

This AFM image shows the morphology of SiNx Nano-pillars which were formed by RIE. Crystalline silicon as substrate, SiNx was deposited on it to work as anti-reflective coating layer for this solar cell. The Nano-pillar structure would trap more solar energy into the cell thus to increase energy conversion efficiency.

Image by: Tian ZhangSchool of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering (SPREE)

Microscope/Technique: Bruker ICON SPM

Supervisor: Dr. Bram Hoex